Voice clock for windows phone updated

Windows Phone gadget can be used part of the interior design and act as a digital clock.
This clock prints out time differently every minute the way people do. It is either ‘Two past midnight’, or ‘Two minutes past twelve’, or ‘Twelve two’.

Features :
  •  Six languages supported (English, Russian, French, German, Dutch and Swedish).        
  •  Three types of clock view (textual, digital and analog).
  • Tapping screen causes the clock to voice the current time (Internet connection required).
  • Voice intervals and text color are adjustable.
  • Screen gestures allow switching current language and colors quickly.
  • Automatically voice time on selected interval (15 minutes, half an hour, every hour).
  • Alarm clock can be set to the particular time and it will wake up even if application is not running.
  • In digital mode, the clock uses huge font size for better vision.

    Voice Clock can help you learn to spell numerals and tell time in foreign languages.

    Download it here

    via #WMPoweruser.com

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Nokia's foldable Battery Designs

Smartphone OEMs like Samsung and LG have already started making devices with curved displays. Recently, Samsung even promised to release fully foldable displays in 2015. To make a foldable mobile device, you need foldable battery technology. LG revealed their foldable battery tech few months back. In a recently revealed Nokia’s patent, Nokia’s design of foldable batter technology was revealed. The battery pack will be made of ‘foldable cells’ that can curve and bend with the shape of a phone. The same technology can be used to fill in battery between the free spaces available in small devices. This could lead to super-thin and foldable devices.

‘Even though the internal components are becoming smaller and smaller, batteries generally lag behind other technological advancements, consistently consuming a large portion of the portable electronic device.
‘In current portable electronic devices, to have a curved and aesthetically pleasing form factor, space is generally wasted between the battery and a case making the portable electronic device seem larger and a result may be less appealing,’
‘Additionally, there may also be wasted space between the internal components and the case and/or between certain internal components.’

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Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (2014 edition) review

Remember when people used personal computers - desktops and laptops - to check email, view video and keep tabs on Facebook? Back in that far-away era, I'd have several windows open for Web browsers, a word processor, a photo editor and sometimes a reader for PDF documents.

I miss that capability on mobile devices, particularly on full-size tablets with a decent amount of display space. With iPads and Android tablets, I'm typically limited to one window displayed at a time; other apps run in the background, out of sight. With Windows 8 tablets, I can run two windows side by side, but I'm constrained in what I can do with them. It gets better with the Windows 8.1 update due out next week, but it's still not the free-for-all I had with PCs.

So I marveled at a pair of multitasking features that come with Samsung's new tablet, formally called Galaxy Note 10.1 - 2014 Edition. Sporting a 10.1-inch display, measured diagonally, the Note tablet goes on sale in the U.S. on Thursday at a starting price of $550.

The first of the multitasking features, called Multi-Window, has been available in Samsung devices for about a year, but it works with many more apps now. You can run two apps side by side, such as Facebook on one side and YouTube video on the other.Like Windows 8 tablets, you're limited to just two apps. You can change how much of the screen each one takes, a capability coming with Windows 8.1, but you can't choose to have a window take up just the top left corner, the way you can on PCs. In addition, Multi-Window isn't a universal feature. Apps for Netflix and Hulu won't work, for instance. You currently have about 18 apps to choose from, including Facebook and a variety of Google and Samsung apps.

With that limitation, it's nice that Samsung Electronics Co. is supplementing Multi-Window with a feature called Pen Window.

With it, simply draw a box on the screen with the included stylus, and choose one of seven apps to open in a new window. Do it again and again until you open all seven apps, if you wish. That's nine in all, counting the two with Multi-Window. Each Pen Window app appears in a window that floats over your main app (or two apps if you use Multi-Window). You can move that window around on your screen and resize it, just as you can on PCs. Need a break from it? Just minimize it into a small dot and move it out of the way.

Like Multi-Window, you're restricted in what apps you can use with Pen Window, though I expect more to get added over time. For now, Pen Window on the tablet works with YouTube, the calculator, the alarm clock, your contacts list, the Web browser and two chat apps - Samsung's ChatOn and Google's Hangouts. I like the fact that you can open all of them and keep them out of the way in a minimized state. That way, it's just one click when you need the calculator and one click when you're done.

The iPad doesn't do that. Amazon's Kindle Fire doesn't do that. Other Android tablets don't do that. Windows 8.1 won't do that - at least not in the tablet-style viewing mode that Microsoft prefers you stick with. You'll have to go to the classic, desktop mode to resize windows, which defeats the purpose of having Windows 8 or 8.1. Windows 8.1 will go further than Multi-Window in letting you run up to four apps side by side, but that works only on larger screens, not portable tablets.

Beyond multitasking, the new Note tablet offers a My Magazine mode giving you personalized highlights, such as news topics of interest, content from your social media feeds and suggestions on things to do and see, based on your current location. It's a good concept, though Facebook isn't available through it yet.

The new tablet also gives you quick access to the tools you can accomplish with its stylus. Pen Window is one. Another feature lets you add notes to a screenshot of what you see. Another lets you clip a section of a Web page and store it with a Web link.

Unfortunately, not everything worked. Text recognition was poor. I'm supposed to be able to jot down an email address or a phone number with the stylus and have that handwriting converted into a contacts entry. But the device constantly confuses the letters "o" and "l" with the numerals "0" and "1."

Pen Window also is more difficult than necessary to set up. You need to take out the stylus for an Air Command tool to appear on the screen. You choose Pen Window, then draw a box on your screen with your stylus. Then you choose the app you want to open. Do all of that again to get additional apps, after figuring out how to get Air Command again with your stylus already out. It would have been simpler to have a button on the home screen that you can tap with your finger or stylus.

In addition, Samsung could have done more with the apps in minimized state. Google's chat app is reduced to a circular icon. It could have flashed or changed colors to notify me of a new chat message, rather than make me open and close it regularly to check.

The tablet's back is still made of plastic, but it feels like leather - an improvement over previous Samsung devices. The tablet does feel heavy, at 1.2 pounds, but that's still lighter than the 1.4 pounds for the full-size iPad. If you want light, wait until early November for the large-size version of Amazon's Kindle Fire HDX. It weighs just 0.83 pound.

Samsung's tablet is also pricey - the $550 starting price tops the iPad's $499 and the Fire's $379. Of course, neither the iPad nor the Fire includes a stylus.

One more complaint: Although the tablet uses the latest version of Android, 4.3, it doesn't offer that system's feature of letting multiple people share a device with separate profiles.

With the Note, it's clear some of the functionality we've long associated with PCs is coming to devices we're just getting to know. There's more to be done, including support for multiple users, but I'm glad Samsung is leading us in that direction.

For more Information or any help,Kindly Reach

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Huawei Launches "Worlds's Slimmest Smartphone" in India

Huawei Ascend P6 with 4.7-inch HD display launched at Rs. 29,999

Huawei's new smartphone, the Ascend P6, has been launched for the Indian market, at Rs. 29,999. The device was listed online in the fourth week of October on an ecommerce website for a discounted price of Rs. 25,750. Huawei first unveiled the Ascend P6 back in June this year.

The Huawei Ascend P6 is called the slimmest smartphone in the world by the company, and measures in at 6.2mm, while weighing 120 grams. The smartphone comes in Black, Pink and White colours. It features a 4.7-inch LCD display that has a resolution of 720x1280 pixels. It's powered by the company's in-house chipset, the Huawei K3V2 quad-core processor, clocked at 1.5GHz and coupled with 2GB of RAM.

The Ascend P6 includes an 8-megapixel rear camera with a BSI sensor, capable of recording 1080p HD video, apart from a 5-megapixel front-facing camera. It runs Android 4.2.2 Jelly Bean and features Huawei's Emotion UI 1.6 OS layer on top. It offers 8GB of inbuilt storage expandable up to 32GB via microSD card and has a 2000 mAh battery.

On Wednesday, two of Huawei's recently launched Android phablets, the Ascend G610 and Ascend G700, also made it to the Indian market via an online retailer. The Huawei Ascend G610 and Huawei Ascend G700 have been listed at Infibeam for Rs. 12,499 and Rs. 16,500 respectively. The Chinese major had unveiled both the devices back in September this year, at an event in Taiwan.

Huawei Ascend P6 key specifications
  • 4.7-inch HD in-cell LCD screen with a resolution of 720x1280 pixels
  • 1.5GHz quad-core Processor
  • 2GB RAM
  • 8GB Internal storage expandable via microSD card
  • Dual-SIM with dual-standby support
  • 8-megapixel rear camera
  • 5-megapixel front facing camera
  • 2000mAh battery
  • Android 4.2.2 Jelly Bean with Emotion UI

    For more Information or any help,Kindly Reach

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iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c review: Fingerprint sensor

Passcodes are such a pain that I've relaxed the security settings on my Android phone. I'm willing to forgo the extra safety, just so I'm asked to punch in the code less often. When I got my hands on Apple's new iPhone 5s, one of the first things I tried was a feature that allows you to bypass the passcode using a fingerprint.
I had a lot of fun unlocking the phone over and over again. Who knew biometric authentication could be such a blast?
The fingerprint sensor alone is worth the extra $100 you'll pay for the iPhone 5s over an iPhone 5c. Both phones will come out Friday. In the week I've had with both, I've also been impressed with the better camera and slow-motion video in the 5s.
The 5c, meanwhile, is largely last year's iPhone 5 with a plastic casing instead of aluminum and glass. This isn't cheap plastic, but a type offering the slippery feel of a shiny ceramic tile. It comes in five colors.

Both phones come with iOS 7, the most radical change to Apple's operating system software for mobile devices since its 2007 debut. Many of the changes are cosmetic, but there are functional improvements such as easier access to frequently used settings and apps.

I will review iOS 7 separately. Many existing iPhone users won't need more than the free update, which is available starting Wednesday. Neither the 5c nor the 5s offers improvements on the screen size, which remains at 4 inches (10 centimeters) diagonally. But new features and new colors may draw you to one of these new iPhones.

iPhone 5s (available in silver, gold or gray; starts at $199 with two-year service contract, or $649 without a contract)
When you set up the 5s, you're asked to tap the home button with a finger several times so the phone can create a mathematical representation of your print. To unlock the phone, you simply tap the home button, and the phone will compare the two taps. You can tap from any angle, even sideways or upside down. This fingerprint ID also works as a way to authenticate the purchase of apps and content within apps.
For security reasons, there are still times you'll need your four-digit passcode, including after 48 hours of inactivity and before adding a new fingerprint. If the phone fails to recognize your print, you can always use the passcode. I had trouble only when my fingers were wet or greasy. One evening, I ordered pizza with an oily pepperoni topping and ate it without a napkin. The fingerprint sensor worked after one slice, but not two. Indian naan bread also threw off the sensor.

Apple says it stores the print data on your phone, in a place that's inaccessible to other apps or to Apple's remote servers. The company also says it's not possible to convert a fingerprint from a police file into something the phone will recognize, as the sensor reads a sub-epidermal layer of the finger. And the finger needs to be live - cutting off a thumb won't work.
I'm convinced Apple has given a lot of thought to security. If you're still uneasy about the fingerprint scan, you can stick with the passcode. The feature is optional.
Meanwhile, the 5S's camera takes better night and indoor shots. Although the main camera remains at 8 megapixels, individual pixels are larger and thus better at sensing light. The camera's shutter also opens wider to let in more light. For flash shots, the camera fires two bursts of light at once, each slightly different in color. The iPhone adjusts the combination of the two colors automatically to match ambient lighting.

I typically avoid using the flash in any camera because its strong burst of whitish light overpowers whatever's in the room. In a hallway with strong yellow light, for instance, the flashes on my high-end camera and the iPhone 5 made the walls white. The 5s, on the other hand, managed to preserve the yellow. I also got better skin tones on some flash shots taken with the 5s. Using the 5c, faces and arms looked more pale.
Night shots without the flash are also sharper. Sometimes, cameras overcompensate for low light by making the few points of light too bright. The 5s typically has those scenes properly balanced.
Of course, these improvements won't make all photos better. Many shots appear the same whether taken with the 5, the 5c or the 5s. In other shots, differences are subtle.
The 5s can also shoot slow motion video. You can choose the parts you want in slow motion and regular speed, and you can change your mind later. A burst mode lets you snap 100 shots in 10 seconds, compared with 40 seconds on the 5c. The phone picks out the best moments and filters out duplicates. The front-facing camera is better than the one on previous iPhones. It has larger pixels for low-light videoconferencing.
Many of these features are possible because of Apple's faster A7 processor. A companion chip, the M7, handles motion-related data without draining as much of the battery, something useful for fitness trackers. All this power is so new, apps taking advantage of them weren't available for me to test
iPhone5c (available in green, blue, yellow, pink or white; starts at $99 with two-year service contract, or $549 without a contract)
Plastic colors aside, the 5c is mostly the same as the iPhone 5 it replaces, with the older A6 chip and a main camera that's not as good in low light. Because the chip is slower, it couldn't do slow-motion video or take as many shots per second. But it does have the 5s's improved front-facing camera.
The 5c is for those who really want the bright color. If you can afford the additional $100 and can do with silver, gold or gray, get the 5s instead. The fingerprint sensor will make security less annoying, and the better camera will be more useful in documenting life. A hundred dollars isn't that much when you compare it with the full price of the phone.

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Jolla Phone Full Specification and Sailfish OS Demo

Jolla Phone Spcs
Jolla, the company behind the Linux-based Sailfish OS, has finally released the official specs of its first smartphone, and this time around it's a bit more specific. Based in Finland, Jolla's ambitious have received a serious bump ever since local Nokia's handset business changed hands, leaving a vacuum of local fans behind.

The Jolla smartphone is definitely one those 'alternative' projects that we're secretly rooting for, and we can't wait to see if the Sailfish OS will manage to cause ripples in the established state of affairs. If it does, however, it certainly won't be because of impressive hardware or a low price point. Rather, the company has decided to narrow it down to a great experience, and really stylish hardware -- while the internals themselves are the Jolla smartphone is a looker.

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